hdiff output

r30559/GMIN.tex 2016-06-03 19:30:20.082768142 +0100 r30558/GMIN.tex 2016-06-03 19:30:20.558774422 +0100
1206: {\it MSC} &   & {\it nnBC} & {\it mmBC} & {\it sigBC} & {\it scepsBC} & \\1206: {\it MSC} &   & {\it nnBC} & {\it mmBC} & {\it sigBC} & {\it scepsBC} & \\
1207: {\it MSC} & {\it l} & {\it nnCC} & {\it mmCC} & {\it sigCC} & {\it scepsCC} & {\it sccC}1207: {\it MSC} & {\it l} & {\it nnCC} & {\it mmCC} & {\it sigCC} & {\it scepsCC} & {\it sccC}
1208: \end{tabular}1208: \end{tabular}
1209: 1209: 
1210: \item {\it MSORIG \/}: specifies a particular tight-binding potential for silicon.1210: \item {\it MSORIG \/}: specifies a particular tight-binding potential for silicon.
1211: 1211: 
1212: \item {\it MSTRANS \/}: specifies an alternative tight-binding potential for silicon.1212: \item {\it MSTRANS \/}: specifies an alternative tight-binding potential for silicon.
1213: 1213: 
1214: \item {\it MULLERBROWN \/}: specifies the 2D Muller-Brown potential.1214: \item {\it MULLERBROWN \/}: specifies the 2D Muller-Brown potential.
1215: 1215: 
1216: \item {\it MULTIPOT\/}: Use the flexible multiple potential scheme to define your system. 
1217: Different atoms can interact via different types of potential and a particular atom can be associated  
1218: with more than one type of potential. Detailed instructions to use this scheme are given 
1219: as comments in {\tt multipot.f90}, { \tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90}. 
1220:  
1221: In theory, any subroutine with the correct signature can be used as a potential function. Only 
1222: the potentials in {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} have been tested. 
1223: At the time of writing, these are the LJ, WCA and harmonic-spring potentials. {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} 
1224: contains functions which are called for a pair of atoms at a time (e.g. harmonic springs). {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} 
1225: contains functions which require coordinates of all the atoms involved in the interaction. Although LJ and WCA are 
1226: pairwise potentials, it is more efficient to treat them as isotropic and loop over interacting pairs in the function 
1227: call rather than to call pairwise\_lj for every pair of atoms ($N^2$ function calls give a large performance overhead). 
1228:  
1229: {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} contain generic functions for calculating the 
1230: first and second derivatives of isotropic pairwise potential functions. Detailed instructions are found in the source code. 
1231:  
1232: An input file {\tt multipotconfig} is used to specify which potential functions are to be used and 
1233: which atoms use each potential. For each type of potential in the system, {\tt multipotconfig} should  
1234: contain the following: 
1235:  
1236: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1237:  
1238: { \it POT } 
1239:  
1240: { \it POTTYPE n scale nparams }  
1241:  
1242: { \it [params] } 
1243:  
1244: followed by a list of atom indices which will use this potential (the format of the list will depend  
1245: on the particular potential).  
1246:  
1247: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1248:  
1249: { \it POTTYPE } is a string identifier for the type of potential being used, 
1250: { \it n } is the number of atoms using this potential and { \it scale } is the energy unit for this potential 
1251: (which should be set to 1.0 for at least one potential). { \it nparams} is the number of potential-specific 
1252: parameters which are required, and { \it [params] } is a list of these parameters. 
1253:  
1254: Be aware that using {\it MULTIPOT} will give a slight performance hit, because of the several function calls and bookkeeping that 
1255: is associated with each call to {\it POTENTIAL}. This scheme is intended for playing around with composite potentials, for systems which are small enough that performance is not a big issue, or for systems involving many different potential functions which will be much too fiddly to hard-code a single subroutine. 
1256:  
1257: \item {\it MULTIPERM \/}: instead of basin-hopping, systematically span the permutation space of the multiset containing particle labels. Uses a more general algorithm than {\it ENPERMS \/}.1216: \item {\it MULTIPERM \/}: instead of basin-hopping, systematically span the permutation space of the multiset containing particle labels. Uses a more general algorithm than {\it ENPERMS \/}.
1258: 1217: 
1259: \item {\it MULTIPLICITY xmul\/}: specifies the multiplicity of the electronic state in {\it DFTB\/}1218: \item {\it MULTIPLICITY xmul\/}: specifies the multiplicity of the electronic state in {\it DFTB\/}
1260: calculations.1219: calculations.
1261: 1220: 
1262: \item {\it MWPOT}: calls a Stillinger-Weber type potential with parameters appropriate for water\cite{MolineroM09}.1221: \item {\it MWPOT}: calls a Stillinger-Weber type potential with parameters appropriate for water\cite{MolineroM09}.
1263: 1222: 
1264: \item {\it NATB}: specifies the sodium tight-binding potential of Calvo and Spiegelmann.1223: \item {\it NATB}: specifies the sodium tight-binding potential of Calvo and Spiegelmann.
1265: This potential can be guided by also specifying {\it GUPTA 21} in the {\tt data} file.1224: This potential can be guided by also specifying {\it GUPTA 21} in the {\tt data} file.
1266: 1225: 
1697: specify that the RMSD compared to a reference geometry is calculated. The reference geometry must 1656: specify that the RMSD compared to a reference geometry is calculated. The reference geometry must 
1698: be given in xyz-format in an additional file {\tt compare}. {\it rmssave} is an integer 1657: be given in xyz-format in an additional file {\tt compare}. {\it rmssave} is an integer 
1699: that specifies the number of lowest energy geometries and RMSD $\le$ {\it rmslimit}1658: that specifies the number of lowest energy geometries and RMSD $\le$ {\it rmslimit}
1700: to save. Geometries are only saved if their RMSD's are more than {\it rmstol} 1659: to save. Geometries are only saved if their RMSD's are more than {\it rmstol} 
1701: different. The flag {\it lca} controls whether the all-atom RMSD ({\it lca}=0) or the $C_{\alpha}$-RMSD 1660: different. The flag {\it lca} controls whether the all-atom RMSD ({\it lca}=0) or the $C_{\alpha}$-RMSD 
1702: ({\it lca}=1) is calculated. The flag {\it best} determines which structure is compared to the reference1661: ({\it lca}=1) is calculated. The flag {\it best} determines which structure is compared to the reference
1703: after each quench. {\it best}=0 implies the current quench minimum and {\it best}=1 implies the current best (lowest energy) minimum. If {\it TRACKDATA} is also specified, the RMSD calculated after each quench is produced in the file `rmsd' in gnuplot readable format.1662: after each quench. {\it best}=0 implies the current quench minimum and {\it best}=1 implies the current best (lowest energy) minimum. If {\it TRACKDATA} is also specified, the RMSD calculated after each quench is produced in the file `rmsd' in gnuplot readable format.
1704: 1663: 
1705: \item {\it ROTAMER maxchange pselect occuw (centre cutoff)\/}: Used with AMBER9 only. Specifies that rotamer moves should be taken. Every step, up to {\it maxchange} rotamers may be selected with a probability {\it pselect}. {\it occuw} determines the minimum \% occupation a rotamer must have to be selected from the library\cite{lovelljm00} when making a change. For example, {\it occuw} $= 0.004$ restricts possible rotamer choice to those with a greater than 0.4\% occupation. If you want to focus rotamer changes around a ligand/binding pocket, the optional {\it centre} and {\it cutoff} arguements may be used. {\it centre} specifies the residue of interest (for example a ligand), and {\it cutoff} the limiting distance from this centre that rotamers may be changed. The selection probability decreases linearlly from the {\it centre} residue. To use these moves, you need three files found in the SCRIPTS directory: PdbRotamerSearch, penultimate.lib and rotamermove.csh in your working directory for each run. 1664: \item {\it ROTAMER maxchange pselect occuw (centre cutoff)\/}: Used with AMBER9 only. Specifies that rotamer moves should be taken. Every step, up to {\it maxchange} rotamers may be selected with a probability {\it pselect}. {\it occuw} determines the minimum \% occupation a rotamer must have to be selected from the library\cite{lovelljm00} when making a change. For example, {\it occuw} $= 0.004$ restricts possible rotamer choice to those with a greater than 0.4\% occupation. If you want to focus rotamer changes around a ligand/binding pocket, the optional {\it centre} and {\it cutoff} arguements may be used. {\it centre} specifies the residue of interest (for example a ligand), and {\it cutoff} the limiting distance from this centre that rotamers may be changed. The selection probability decreases linearlly from the {\it centre} residue. To use these moves, you need three files found in the SCRIPTS directory: PdbRotamerSearch, penultimate.lib and rotamermove.csh in your working directory for each run. 
1706: 1665: 
1707: \item {\it ROTATEHINGE freq factor}: For use with the plate-folding potential (but could possibly be used elsewhere as well). An input file {\tt hingeconfig} is used to define hinges between sets of rigid bodies. Every {\it freq} steps, the set of rigid bodies on the ``moving side'' of the hinge are rotated about the hinge axis by a random angle between $-\pi \times factor$  and $\pi \times factor$. 
1708:  
1709: For each hinge, {\tt hingeconfig} contains the following three lines: 
1710:  
1711: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1712:  
1713: {\it nmove}, the number of plates on the ``moving side'' of the hinge 
1714:  
1715: {\it [plate\_indices] }, a list of rigid body indices for the moving plates 
1716:  
1717: {\it atom1 atom2 atom3 atom4}. 
1718:  
1719: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1720:  
1721: The hinge axis connects the midpoints of the lines connecting the two pairs ({\it atom1}, {\it atom2}) and ({\it atom3}, {\it atom4}). For the plate potential, each of these atom pairs should straddle the hinge and be connected by a stiff spring. {\it atom1} lies on the same plate as {\it atom3}. {\it atom2} and {\it atom4} are on the opposite side of the hinge. 
1722:  
1723: \item {\it ROTATERIGID freq factor}: for use with the generalised rigid body framework, 1666: \item {\it ROTATERIGID freq factor}: for use with the generalised rigid body framework, 
1724: {\it RIGIDINIT}. Randomly rotates each rigid body in the system by a factor of $2\pi$ multiplied by {\it factor} every {\it freq} steps.1667: {\it RIGIDINIT}. Randomly rotates each rigid body in the system by a factor of $2\pi$ multiplied by {\it factor} every {\it freq} steps.
1725: 1668: 
1726: \item {\it SANDBOX\/:} Specifies that the sandbox potential should be used. This keyword requires an auxiliary input file {\tt rbdata} and produces an auxiliary output visualization file {\tt sandout.xyz}. See the Sandbox section of this documentation for information on producing rbdata files and for examples.1669: \item {\it SANDBOX\/:} Specifies that the sandbox potential should be used. This keyword requires an auxiliary input file {\tt rbdata} and produces an auxiliary output visualization file {\tt sandout.xyz}. See the Sandbox section of this documentation for information on producing rbdata files and for examples.
1727: 1670: 
1728: \item {\it SAVE nsave\/}: {\it nsave\/} is an integer that specifies the number of lowest1671: \item {\it SAVE nsave\/}: {\it nsave\/} is an integer that specifies the number of lowest
1729: energy geometries to save and summarise in the file {\tt lowest}. 1672: energy geometries to save and summarise in the file {\tt lowest}. 
1730: Arrays are now dynamically allocated, so any positive integer can be specified. Note that if {\it nsave\/} is large, minima that are not in the Markov chain might also be written out which might be high energy non-physical conformations.  1673: Arrays are now dynamically allocated, so any positive integer can be specified. Note that if {\it nsave\/} is large, minima that are not in the Markov chain might also be written out which might be high energy non-physical conformations.  
1731: 1674: 
1732: \item {\it SAVEMULTIMINONLY\/}: specifies that only multiminima are to be considered for the final dump to {\tt lowest}.1675: \item {\it SAVEMULTIMINONLY\/}: specifies that only multiminima are to be considered for the final dump to {\tt lowest}.


r30559/OPTIM.tex 2016-06-03 19:30:20.306771107 +0100 r30558/OPTIM.tex 2016-06-03 19:30:20.814777811 +0100
171: {\it frq} is the frequency at which the adjustment is made, based on the171: {\it frq} is the frequency at which the adjustment is made, based on the
172: deviation of the image spacing from uniformity. If the spacing deviates172: deviation of the image spacing from uniformity. If the spacing deviates
173: by more than {\it tol\/} then the force constant is increased by173: by more than {\it tol\/} then the force constant is increased by
174: {\it frac\/}; if it is lower then the force constant is decreased by174: {\it frac\/}; if it is lower then the force constant is decreased by
175: {\it frac\/}.175: {\it frac\/}.
176: 176: 
177: \item {\it ADM n}: will cause the177: \item {\it ADM n}: will cause the
178: interatomic distance matrix to be printed every {\it n\/} cycles;178: interatomic distance matrix to be printed every {\it n\/} cycles;
179: the default for {\it n\/} is 20. This matrix is not printed by default.179: the default for {\it n\/} is 20. This matrix is not printed by default.
180: 180: 
181: \item {\it ALIGNRBS n1, n2, ...}: For use with {\it GENRIGID}. Specify that the translation and rotation used for 
182: endpoint alignment should be calculated from a subset of rigid bodies in the system, specified by {\it n1, n2, ...}. 
183: The number of arguments that may be specified is limited by the allowed length of the keyword line. 
184: The calculated translation and rotation are applied to the whole system. Note, there is currently no permutational 
185: alignment implemented, so this routine will not detect permutational isomers. 
186:  
187: \item {\it ALPHA}: sets exponent value for averaged Gaussian and Morse potentials,181: \item {\it ALPHA}: sets exponent value for averaged Gaussian and Morse potentials,
188: default value is 6.182: default value is 6.
189: 183: 
190: \item {\it ALLPOINTS}: turns on printing of coordinates to file {\tt points} for184: \item {\it ALLPOINTS}: turns on printing of coordinates to file {\tt points} for
191: all intermediate configurations. Default is false.185: all intermediate configurations. Default is false.
192: 186: 
193: %\item {\it AMBER}: specifies a calculation with the AMBER potential. This requires187: %\item {\it AMBER}: specifies a calculation with the AMBER potential. This requires
194: %      auxiliary files {\tt amber.dat} and {\tt coords.amber} in the same directory.188: %      auxiliary files {\tt amber.dat} and {\tt coords.amber} in the same directory.
195: 189: 
196: \item {\it AMBER12 inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies calculation with the interfaced version of the AMBER 12 190: \item {\it AMBER12 inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies calculation with the interfaced version of the AMBER 12 
197: {\tt pmemd} program. AMBER 12 requires an additional input file, {\tt min.in}, which specifies191: \tt{pmemd} program. AMBER 12 requires an additional input file, \tt{min.in}, which specifies
198: keywords for the AMBER 12 potential. It also requires appropriate topology and coordinates, in files192: keywords for the AMBER 12 potential. It also requires appropriate topology and coordinates, in files
199: named {\tt coords.prmtop} and {\tt coords.inpcrd} respectively. For details, see the AMBER 12 manual.193: named \tt{coords.prmtop} and \tt{coords.inpcrd} respectively. For details, see the AMBER 12 manual.
200: As with the AMBER 9 interface, cutoffs are smoothed, using the {\tt min.in} keyword {\tt ifswitch=1}.194: As with the AMBER 9 interface, cutoffs are smoothed, using the \tt{min.in} keyword \tt{ifswitch=1}.
201: Additional keywords are as AMBER 9, though it should be noted that analytical second derivatives are not195: Additional keywords are as AMBER 9, though it should be noted that analytical second derivatives are not
202: available through use of the {\it NAB} keyword.196: available through use of the {\it NAB} keyword.
203: Users of {\tt GMIN} should note that, unlike in {\tt GMIN}, specifying {\it AMBER12} without {\it inpcrdformat}197: Users of \tt{GMIN} should note that, unlike in \tt{GMIN}, specifying {\it AMBER12} without {\it inpcrdformat}
204: assumes that input coordinates are provided in xyz, rather than AMBER restart format.198: assumes that input coordinates are provided in xyz, rather than AMBER restart format.
205: 199: 
206: \item {\it AMBER9 inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies a calculation with the interfaced 200: \item {\it AMBER9 inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies a calculation with the interfaced 
207: version of the Amber 9 program package. From this package the Amber force fields 201: version of the Amber 9 program package. From this package the Amber force fields 
208: are being used, with small modifications ({\it e.g.} smooth cut-offs). 202: are being used, with small modifications ({\it e.g.} smooth cut-offs). 
209: Starting coordinates do not need to be specified in the {\tt odata} file, they203: Starting coordinates do not need to be specified in the {\tt odata} file, they
210: are read from {\it inpcrd} instead (default {\it coords.inpcrd}), in Amber inpcrd 204: are read from {\it inpcrd} instead (default {\it coords.inpcrd}), in Amber inpcrd 
211: file format specified by the second optional argument {\it inpcrdformat}.205: file format specified by the second optional argument {\it inpcrdformat}.
212: If the second argument is missing, it is assumed that {\it inpcrd} contains206: If the second argument is missing, it is assumed that {\it inpcrd} contains
213: only three columns with the xyz coordinates of all atoms, in the same order 207: only three columns with the xyz coordinates of all atoms, in the same order 
245: The method is an extension of the original bulkmindist.f90 routine for matching permutationl isomers. Atoms are overlayed and the number of exactly matching239: The method is an extension of the original bulkmindist.f90 routine for matching permutationl isomers. Atoms are overlayed and the number of exactly matching
246: g atoms is maximised. (ATOMMATCHINIT uses atom matching only for aligning initial structures and then reverts to the default distance method.)240: g atoms is maximised. (ATOMMATCHINIT uses atom matching only for aligning initial structures and then reverts to the default distance method.)
247: With ATOMMATCHDIST/INIT, the method is non-deterministic to maximise efficiency. It has been optimised to work particularly well for providing small distan241: With ATOMMATCHDIST/INIT, the method is non-deterministic to maximise efficiency. It has been optimised to work particularly well for providing small distan
248: ces between similar structures and for removing very large distances. However, it will not always outperform the default method for middling distances.    242: ces between similar structures and for removing very large distances. However, it will not always outperform the default method for middling distances.    
249: Currently only one method for calculating distances, atom matching or the default, can be used.  243: Currently only one method for calculating distances, atom matching or the default, can be used.  
250: 244: 
251: \item {\it ATOMMATCHFULL}: As for {\it ATOMMATCHDIST}, but provides a slow deterministic result that should always outperform or equal the default distance calculation and ATOMMATCHDIST but may never finish.245: \item {\it ATOMMATCHFULL}: As for {\it ATOMMATCHDIST}, but provides a slow deterministic result that should always outperform or equal the default distance calculation and ATOMMATCHDIST but may never finish.
252: 246: 
253: \item {\it ATOMMATCHINIT}: see {\it ATOMMATCHDIST}.247: \item {\it ATOMMATCHINIT}: see {\it ATOMMATCHDIST}.
254: 248: 
255: \item {\it AVOIDCOLLISIONS tol}: For use with {\it GENRIGID}. When performing the angle-axis interpolation prior to a DNEB run,  
256: check the energy of the highest-energy image. If it is greater than {\it tol}, then for each rigid body in turn we reverse the sense of interpolation for its angle axis vector (so the body rotates in the opposite direction to before). Hopefully this will avoid two rigid bodies colliding (which is assumed to be what causes the high-energy image). If reversing the rotation direction results in a decreased maximum image energy, the new sense of rotation is accepted. If at any point the maximum image energy falls below {\it tol}, the testing process is stopped. 
257:  
258: This is currently a rather crude method and not terrible effective. It will be improved in the future. 
259:  
260: \item {\it AXIS n}: specifies the highest symmetry axis to search for in249: \item {\it AXIS n}: specifies the highest symmetry axis to search for in
261: routine {\bf symmetry}; default is six.250: routine {\bf symmetry}; default is six.
262: 251: 
263: \item {\it BBCART\/}: use Cartesian coordinates for all backbone atoms and for252: \item {\it BBCART\/}: use Cartesian coordinates for all backbone atoms and for
264:   prolines. Right now, only works for natural internals.253:   prolines. Right now, only works for natural internals.
265: 254: 
266: \item {\it BBRSDM gamma epsilon sigma1 sigma2 M alpha gmax nstep}: specifies255: \item {\it BBRSDM gamma epsilon sigma1 sigma2 M alpha gmax nstep}: specifies
267: the steepest-descent minimiser introduced by Barzilai and Borwein \cite{BB-IMAJNA-1988}256: the steepest-descent minimiser introduced by Barzilai and Borwein \cite{BB-IMAJNA-1988}
268: and modified by Raydan \cite{Raydan-SIAMJO-1997} for a maximum of $nstep$ iterations257: and modified by Raydan \cite{Raydan-SIAMJO-1997} for a maximum of $nstep$ iterations
269: in a pathway calculation. The method uses 258: in a pathway calculation. The method uses 
1621: \item {\it MULTIJOB startfile finishfile\/}: the same job will be rerun sequentially1610: \item {\it MULTIJOB startfile finishfile\/}: the same job will be rerun sequentially
1622: for input coordinates read from files {\it startfile\/} and {\it finishfile\/}.1611: for input coordinates read from files {\it startfile\/} and {\it finishfile\/}.
1623: The usual coordinates are expected, for most systems after the {\it POINTS\/}1612: The usual coordinates are expected, for most systems after the {\it POINTS\/}
1624: keyword in {\tt odata}, and the {\tt finish} file, if applicable.1613: keyword in {\tt odata}, and the {\tt finish} file, if applicable.
1625: After running this task, fresh coordinates are read from {\it startfile\/}1614: After running this task, fresh coordinates are read from {\it startfile\/}
1626: and {\it finishfile\/}, if applicable to the run type.1615: and {\it finishfile\/}, if applicable to the run type.
1627: If the file names contain the string `xyz' then the coordinates are assumed to1616: If the file names contain the string `xyz' then the coordinates are assumed to
1628: be in xyz format. Otherwise they are read as an uninterrupted sequence of numbers1617: be in xyz format. Otherwise they are read as an uninterrupted sequence of numbers
1629: in free format.1618: in free format.
1630: 1619: 
1631: \item {\it MULTIPOT\/}: Use the flexible multiple potential scheme to define your system. 
1632: Different atoms can interact via different types of potential and a particular atom can be associated  
1633: with more than one type of potential. Detailed instructions to use this scheme are given 
1634: as comments in {\tt multipot.f90}, { \tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90}. 
1635:  
1636: In theory, any subroutine with the correct signature can be used as a potential function. Only 
1637: the potentials in {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} have been tested. 
1638: At the time of writing, these are the LJ, WCA and harmonic-spring potentials. {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} 
1639: contains functions which are called for a pair of atoms at a time (e.g. harmonic springs). {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} 
1640: contains functions which require coordinates of all the atoms involved in the interaction. Although LJ and WCA are 
1641: pairwise potentials, it is more efficient to treat them as isotropic and loop over interacting pairs in the function 
1642: call rather than to call pairwise\_lj for every pair of atoms ($N^2$ function calls give a large performance overhead). 
1643:  
1644: {\tt pairwise\_potentials.f90} and {\tt isotropic\_potentials.f90} contain generic functions for calculating the 
1645: first and second derivatives of isotropic pairwise potential functions. Detailed instructions are found in the source code. 
1646:  
1647: An input file {\tt multipotconfig} is used to specify which potential functions are to be used and 
1648: which atoms use each potential. For each type of potential in the system, {\tt multipotconfig} should  
1649: contain the following: 
1650:  
1651: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1652:  
1653: { \it POT } 
1654:  
1655: { \it POTTYPE n scale nparams }  
1656:  
1657: { \it [params] } 
1658:  
1659: followed by a list of atom indices which will use this potential (the format of the list will depend  
1660: on the particular potential).  
1661:  
1662: \vspace{0.5cm} 
1663:  
1664: { \it POTTYPE } is a string identifier for the type of potential being used, 
1665: { \it n } is the number of atoms using this potential and { \it scale } is the energy unit for this potential 
1666: (which should be set to 1.0 for at least one potential). { \it nparams} is the number of potential-specific 
1667: parameters which are required, and { \it [params] } is a list of these parameters. 
1668:  
1669: Be aware that using {\it MULTIPOT} will give a slight performance hit, because of the several function calls and bookkeeping that 
1670: is associated with each call to {\it POTENTIAL}. This scheme is intended for playing around with composite potentials, for systems which are small enough that performance is not a big issue, or for systems involving many different potential functions which will be much too fiddly to hard-code a single subroutine. 
1671:  
1672: \item {\it NAB inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies a calculation with the interfaced1620: \item {\it NAB inpcrd inpcrdformat\/}: specifies a calculation with the interfaced
1673: version of the Nucleic Acid Builder program package. From this package the Amber force fields1621: version of the Nucleic Acid Builder program package. From this package the Amber force fields
1674: are being used only. The syntax is the same as for the {\it AMBER9} keyword. For energy 1622: are being used only. The syntax is the same as for the {\it AMBER9} keyword. For energy 
1675: and gradient evaluations the standard Amber 9 interface is being called. The NAB routines 1623: and gradient evaluations the standard Amber 9 interface is being called. The NAB routines 
1676: are only called for analytical second derivative evaluations. The NAB interface does not 1624: are only called for analytical second derivative evaluations. The NAB interface does not 
1677: have smooth cutoffs implemented at the moment, therefore this keyword should only be used 1625: have smooth cutoffs implemented at the moment, therefore this keyword should only be used 
1678: for systems where the cutoff is large. 1626: for systems where the cutoff is large. 
1679: 1627: 
1680: \item {\it NATB\/}: specifies a tight-binding potential for sodium, silver and lithium.1628: \item {\it NATB\/}: specifies a tight-binding potential for sodium, silver and lithium.
1681: 1629: 


legend
Lines Added 
Lines changed
 Lines Removed

hdiff - version: 2.1.0